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  • 2020

    03/09/2020: Ethnic Studies Professor Chang recieves distinguished award from Korea

    At 18, UC Riverside Professor Edward Chang immigrated to the United States. He had two goals: To learn English and get an education. Decades later, Chang has been awarded the Order of Civil Merit, one of the highest medals from the Republic of Korea, for his academic research promoting Korean culture in both the U.S. and South Korea. Click here for the FULL STORY.

  • 2019

    3/26/2019: Small slice of the American pie, big impact

    With the goal of preserving Korean American history, Park and YOK Center Director Edward T. Chang have launched the Korean American Oral Histories Project. Funded by the Academy of Korean Studies and available online in its entirety, the series consists of filmed and transcribed interviews with more than 50 prominent Korean Americans from around the country. Click here for the FULL STORY.

  • 2018

    1/16/2018: $370,000 Gift to Support UCR's Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies

    Inland Empire local Myung Ki "Mike" Hong has donated $370,000 to the University of California, Riverside's Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies, Hong presented the gift to Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox during a ceremony that was held Friday, January 12. YOK Center Director Edward T. Chang said he aims to dedicate the funding to the development of new youth education initiatives. Click here for the FULL STORY.

  • 2017

    04/27/2017: They were kids during the L.A. riots. Now two Korean Americans tell their community's overlooked story

    Carol Park and Justin Chon, both children of Korean American business owners during the 1992 L.A. riots, share their perspectives on what the riots meant to them as kids — and now as adults. FULL STORY.


    04/25/2017: 25 Years After LA Riots, Koreatown Finds Strength in 'Saigu' Legacy

    For 16 years, Carol Park spent much of her spare time behind bullet-proof windows at a gas station owned by her parents in Compton, California. At 10 years old in 1990, she began working the graveyard shift on the cash register at her family's business. But two years after Park's career as a cashier began, riots broke out across Los Angeles after the acquittal of four LAPD officers who were videotaped beating black motorist Rodney King after a car chase. FULL STORY.


    04/24/2017: California City Honors First Korean Settlement in U.S.

    A California city honored the first organized Korean settlement in the United States as a "point of cultural interest" Thursday. The settlement, Pachappa Camp, was founded in 1905 by Korean independence activist Ahn Chang Ho and established in Riverside, a city 55 miles east of Los Angeles, according to researchers. The city installed a sign at the former encampment, which is now an operations base for a gas company. FULL STORY.


    2/10/2017: Memoir Illuminiates Korean American Experience

    The Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside is proud to announce its second publication: Memoir of a Cashier: Korean Americans Racism, & Riots by Carol K. Park. The book will be available for purchase after Feb. 21, 2017 and on BarnesandNoble.com and Amazon.com in late March. Click here for the FULL STORY.

  • 2016

    12/12/2016: YOK Center Inspires Recognition of Riverside Site as the First Korea Town in the U.S.

    Groundbreaking research by the Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside resulted in the Riverside City Council declaring the site of the nation's first Korea Town a Point of Cultural Interest on December 6. Click here for the FULL STORY.


    12/07/2016: Riverside officially recognizes its Korea Town

    Riverside's historic Korea Town has been named a city point of cultural interest, marking what supporters say is the first organized Korean settlement in the U.S. FULL STORY.


    07/19/2016: Scholar Translates Korean Immigrant Oral Histories

    Edward T. Chang has translated into Korean a collection of oral histories of Korean immigrants gathered by journalist K.W. Lee and Luke and Grace Kim. The collection was published in book form in Korea in May. Click here for the FULL STORY.


    04/01/2016 Korean Media Gush Over Discovery of Interview with 20th Century Hero

    Edward T. Chang's discovery of a 1902 interview with Ahn Chnag Ho illuminates why the Korean independence leader came to the United States. FULL STORY.

  • 2015

    01/29/2015: Korean Consul General to Speak at UCR

    A lecture by Korean Consul General Hyun-myung Kim on Thursday, Feb. 5, leads a series of events presented in February by the Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Click here for the FULL STORY.

  • 2014

    07/01/2014: YOK Center, UCR Awarded Academy of Korean Studies Grant

    The Academy of Korean Studies has awarded the Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at UC Riverside a $135,000, three-year grant to support research on Korean American heroes and identity. FULL STORY.


    5/2/2014YOK Center to Offer Lectures, Historic Display

    The Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at the University of California, Riverside will celebrate Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month in May with a series of events that highlight the Korean American culture and experience. FULL STORY.

  • 2013

    04/22/2013: Young Oak Kim Center Plans Spring Events

    The Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies at UC Riverside will present a series of events that begin April 24 and include a lecture on religion in Korean-American history, screen a documentary about women of the Korean Diaspora and host the annual YOK Quiz Bowl for middle-school children. FULL STORY.

  • 2012

    04/29/2012: Korean American community coalesces

    The Los Angeles riots - six days of arson, looting and death - are known to Korean Americans as Sa-i-gu, "April 29" in Korean, the date the civil unrest started. Sai-i-gu erupted after the acquittal of one Latino and three white police officers charged with the beating of Rodney King, a black motorist. Blacks, whites, Latinos, Asian Americans, Korean Americans and others were directly and indirectly affected - and involved- in Sa-i-gu. But it was Korean immigrant merchants who were, memorably, too often caught in the middle. FULL STORY.


    4/23/2012: Symposium Explores Race Relations 20 Years After Los Angeles Riots

    Race relations and the importance of coalition-building since Los Angeles erupted in violence 20 years ago will be discussed in a symposium at UC Riverside on Wednesday, April 25, beginning at 2 p.m. in HUB 302. FULL STORY.


    04/13/2012: L.A. Middle-schoolers Test Knowledge of Korean American War Hero

    Los Angeles middle-school students who read “Unsung Hero: The Story of Col. Young O. Kim” will test their knowledge of the Korean American war hero in the first YOK Quiz Bowl, presented April 19 by UC Riverside’s Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies. The program will begin at 2 p.m. at YOK Academy, 615 South Shatto Place, Los Angeles. FULL STORY.


    04/12/2012: 20th Anniversary of Los Angeles Riots Observed

    The 1992 Los Angeles riots fundamentally changed how Korean Americans view themselves and their role in local politics and multiethnic, multiracial coalitions. Scholars and community activists will examine the social, political and cultural implications of the riots in a daylong conference on April 28. The event commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles Civil Unrest. FULL STORY.

    02/28/2012: Documentary Film About Korean Diaspora in Kazakhstan Screens March 5

    A documentary film about the Korean diaspora in Kazakhstan will screen at UC Riverside on March 5, followed by a question-and-answer period with film director Y. David Chung. FULL STORY.


    4/29/2012: Opinion- Korean American community coalesces

    The Los Angeles riots - six days of arson, looting and death - are known to Korean Americans as Sa-i-gu, "April 29" in Korean, the date the civil unrest started. Sai-i-gu erupted after the acquittal of one Latino and three white police officers charged with the beating of Rodney King, a black motorist. Blacks, whites, Latinos, Asian Americans, Korean Americans and others were directly and indirectly affected - and involved- in Sa-i-gu. But it was Korean immigrant merchants who were, memorably, too often caught in the middle. FULL STORY.


    1/09/2012: Grant to Korean American Studies Center to Fund Sa-i-gu Conference

    The Korea Foundation has awarded $20,000 to UC Riverside’s Young Oak Kim Center for Korean American Studies to support an April 28 symposium on the 20th anniversary of the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest that devastated Koreatown. FULL STORY.